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Project: Ticket Marketplace

design Exercise:

Personalized greeting & access to ticket marketplace

Meet Wayne, a single thirty-something living in the Upper West Side. He’s a Yankees season ticket holder but since they aren’t in town this evening, he is looking for something else to do. He’s also a fan of music and the arts.  It’s 3pm Friday and he opens his favorite ticket marketplace app. Because he's used the app to buy and sell tickets previously, Wayne has an active account and has built a profile.  

For this exercise,  I drafted some ideas to illustrate how the app could help him decide what to do.  I approached the exercise considering social, local, personalization, upcoming events, deals, to help build a meaningful experience that helps him discover something new to do. 

  • Initial concept sketches exploring various landing page layouts. Weighing different priorities, information density, UI patterns, and content, I was looking to devise an experieince that would feel personalize but not presumptive. The approach I chose to explore was the springboard, with categories driven by the user's personal profile. 
  • In addition, tabbed navigation at the bottom should be as simple as possible. It features three tabs:
    • Let's go! - Stuff happening very soon - today, or up to the next few days at most. It's intended to provide lots of entertainment options when you're looking for something fun at the last minute
    • Home - Fast access to the top-level category navigation, as well as the search, location, and date selection controls
    • Sell - Got tickets to sell? Here's where you can monitor your active sales or post new tickets. 
  • Here's a look at a progression from initial sketch to wireframe and rough visual comp.
  • I was weighing whether to include the user's name in a greeting or as tile label to access to a personalized set of listings. 
  • The aim was for the UI to be as obvious as possible, minimizing the need for instructional content.
  • The Springboard/tile layout - as opposed to a list view - has some limitations. Space for title text is limited, and instead of scrolling, the user will have to tap 'more categories'. But it helps the home screen feel visual, playful and simple. Testing alternate approaches would be essential. And, if we're able to effectively personalize the top categories, the 'more' view may not be needed for most journeys.

With this quick exercise I explored some of the issues and opportunities significant to immediate, quick-decision, event-driven buying experiences. Personalization is a major component and with the right user profile data - interests, price range, timing, demographic trends, and social graphs - the potential to create intelligent experience increases significantly. An ambitious target experience would be a truly intelligent entertainment assistant that could search and alert Wayne about events that fit his interests, budget and availability. Perhaps in v2.0!